Sunday, 17 October 2010

There was much bird activity during an enjoyable morning’s birding, with many flocks of finches busily and noisily piling into the plantation and the surrounding gardens. At least 20 Bramblings were mixed in with 113 Chaffinches, while 104 Goldfinches, 50 Redpolls, 19 Siskins, 12 Greenfinches and the first Bullfinch of the autumn were also logged. A House Sparrow at Ty Pellaf was something of an island rarity and a Little Egret flying down the west coast was also a notable sighting, although the species is becoming an ever-more-frequent visitor to Bardsey. A Snow Bunting and a couple of Lapland Buntings were present, a Red-throated Diver, ten Wigeons and a couple of Mediterranean Gulls were the highlights of sea passage and five Sparrowhawks, three Kestrels, two Merlins, a Buzzard, two Water Rails and a Great Spotted Woodpecker were recorded. Counts of passerines included a flock of 220 Jackdaws circling over the sea, eight Rooks, 289 Starlings, 24 Skylarks, four Grey Wagtails, a Reed Bunting, 35 Blackbirds, five Fieldfares, 18 Song Thrushes, 19 Redwings, one Mistle Thrush, two Blackcaps, six Chiffchaffs, 22 Goldcrests, five Blue Tits and four Great Tits.


Song Thrush (c) Steve Stansfield
Chiffchaff (c) Ben Porter
Song Thrush (c) Ben Porter
Goldcrest (c) Ben Porter
House Sparrow (c) Ben Porter


There have also been some noteworthy invertebrate sightings in recent days:
Western Conifer Seed Bug: this spectacular animal was discovered in the garden of Ty Bach last week. It is an American species that was accidentally imported to Europe in the 1990s and has been turning up in the UK in the last few years. This is apparently the first record for North Wales. Picture (c) Richard Else

The Brick: the first specimen of this species for the island was trapped at the lighthouse last week, but there have been several further records in the last few days.
(c) Richard Else

Pale Pinion: another species that has been added to the Bardsey list in the last week.
(c) Richard Else

3 comments:

  1. Don't think this is a Willow Warbler!
    Phil B, Bryncroes

    ReplyDelete
  2. Is it a Garden Warbler? Looks like it to me.

    ReplyDelete